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News

Please note that any sightings mentioned in news items do not automatically go into our records database. Sightings should be submitted using one of the mechanisms listed on the Recording page.


20 Jun 2024

Summer Butterflies on the Wing at Yarmouth.. Seen today in Bouldnor Forest Yarmouth,1 male Silver-washed Fritillary and a White Admiral.Both flying around vigorously. Also five Marbled White. [Posted by Peter Hunt]


19 Jun 2024

North Baddesley sightings.. First sightings of the year today on my reserve at North Baddesley of White Admiral and Marbled White. Numbers of Meadow Brown building nicely with 54 seen and 36 Large Skipper. Several Cinnabar moth seen trying to lay on ragwort but a lot of my ragwort seems to be dying before it has flowered so not sure what will happen. [Posted by kevin ross]


Havant Thicket. The summer butterflies are now beginning to emerge at Havant Thicket. I spent a couple of hours there this afternoon and saw 4 Marbled Whites, 15 Meadow Browns, 5 Small Heaths, 4 Ringlets, 2 very active White Admirals, 5 Brimstones, 1 Holly Blue and 3 male Large Skippers zinging about in a territorial dogfight. A mix of sunshine and cloud, mild breeze and 18ºC. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


Great Fontley firsts. Highlight of the day, the site's first White-letter Hairstreak of 2024, just the one perched high on the favoured elm. Also seen among the myriad Meadow Browns were Ringlets, and a male Brimstone. [Posted by Andrew Brookes]


18 Jun 2024

Monks Walk, Frater Fields & Woods, Gosport. My first 'Summer' wander around Monks Walk after four weeks in Germany (28 species). Clearly going through the transition from Spring to Summer here and very few species to see. The heavy rains have precluded habitat management and the whole area is overgrown with some parts inaccessible. Total: Red Admiral (1); Meadow Brown (43); Comma (1); Holly Blue (2); Marbled White (2)(M); Brown Argus (1); Speckled Wood (3)(M). [Posted by Francis Plowman]

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Red Admiral
Photo © Francis Plowman
Comma (Summer form)
Photo © Francis Plowman
Marbled White (male)
Photo © Francis Plowman

16 Jun 2024

Ringlets at Yarmouth.. No luck with recording any summer species in Bouldnor Forest near Yarmouth except for several Ringlets along the woodland rides. [Posted by Peter Hunt]

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Photo © Peter Hunt

Noar Hill. A breezy day at Noar Hill, with a mix of sunshine and clouds and the temperature reaching 18ºC. Butterfly numbers continue to be low, with just 9 male Meadow Browns, 6 Small Heaths, 2 Speckled Woods, 1 female Brimstone, 1 Small White, 1 Green-veined White, 2 male Common Blues, 4 Small Blues, 2 Dingy Skippers and a Scarlet Tiger moth seen on a 1 hour walk early this afternoon. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


12 Jun 2024

Havant Thicket. On a mostly overcast afternoon at Havant Thicket, with very little breeze, and temperature between 15-16ºC, I saw 8 male Meadow Browns, 2 pristine male Marbled Whites, 1 Small Heath, 1 Speckled Wood, 1 Grizzled Skipper, plus 3 larvae and 2 pupae of Red Admiral. There were also still a few Brimstone larvae, but the majority have all now pupated. Other insects seen included several beautiful hornets, a cluster of Birch Sawfly larvae (Nematus septentrionalis), a few Brown Silver-line moths and good numbers of Red-legged and Pied Shieldbugs. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


09 Jun 2024

White-Letter Hairstreak at Lakeside. White-letter Hairstreak are now out at Lakeside in Cosham. 4 seen today from Western Road along the edge of the site. They were very active in brief spells of sunshine at around 10.45. I also checked 4 other locations close by where the butterfly was not seen today. [Posted by Paul Harfield]


07 Jun 2024

Havant Thicket. The arrival of the "June Gap" means that most of the spring butterflies have disappeared, while the summer butterflies have barely started. At Havant Thicket this afternoon I counted myself lucky to see a handful of butterflies - 1 female Common Blue, 1 faded Grizzled Skipper, a Small Heath and a couple of male Meadow Browns were all I could manage. Still plenty of Brimstone larvae though, also a few Orange-tip larvae and several Mullein moth larvae. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


Isle of Wight Mini field trip. Isle of Wight mini field trip 6th June 2024

Perfect weather conditions today to be visiting one of the best butterflying sites Compton Chine and Mottiistone Down with Afton Down thrown in for good measure. The Glanville Fritillaries were very active having fights with Large Skippers who were the ‘new kids on the block’ as it were, and they were trying to oust the Fritillaries from their territories. Most of the male Glanville’s were faded but there were a few still in good order and we found several females as well which were newly hatched out.

Other species that were common were the Small Heath, and Common Blues. The Adonis Blue like on the mainland seems to be a bit slow emerging this year, but the ones we did see were pristine. Small Copper and the odd Green Hairstreak amongst the ever growing total of Meadow Browns were the other species along with very tatty Dingy Skippers the odd Grizzled Skipper. Brown Arguses on Afton Down were pristine as their foodplant Rockrose looked splendid on the downland, along with Horseshoe Vetch and Kidney Vetch. Beautiful Orchids like the Bee Orchid were seen, and Pyramidal Orchids were common to see growing everywhere.

Stonechats kept us company on Compton Chine along with multitudes of Skylarks on Mottistone and Afton Downs, and Buzzards hung in the air on the updrafts from the cliff face on the way round from Afton Down to Mottistone, looking rather menacing and just looked odd for such a large bird. A great day out and I thank everyone for their company today. [Posted by ashley Whitlock]

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Glanville Fritillary on territory
Photo © ashley Whitlock
Mating pair of Glanville Fritillaries
Photo © ashley Whitlock
Brown Argus on Afton Down
Photo © ashley Whitlock

05 Jun 2024

Old Winchester Hill and Havant Thicket. Plenty of sunshine today, but a cool breeze kept sightings minimal. In the morning I visited some of the more sheltered areas of Old Winchester Hill, at the bottom of the south slope and in the valley below the car park. Despite a 2 hour search, all I saw were a single Red Admiral, 2 Speckled Woods and 4 Small Heaths.

On the way home I spent another hour at Havant Thicket, but the only adult butterflies seen were a couple of Speckled Woods. There were lots of Brimstone larvae though - I easily found at least 20 of them, all in 3rd or 4th instars. One buckthorn sprig had 8 larvae on it, all within 3 or 4 inches of each other. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


02 Jun 2024

Chalton Down, Old Idsworth. After a visit to Oxenbourne Down I visited Chalton Down where the temperature had increased slightly to 22 degrees. Here I recorded the following: Brimstone 1M 1F, Orange-tip 1M, Small Heath 3 and Red Admiral 1. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


Oxenbourne Down. Today I visited Oxenbourne Down where the temperature reached 21 degrees. I was targeting the Spring brood of the Adonis Blue and was not disappointed in recording 4 in a relatively small area. Totals: Brimstone 2M 1F, Adonis Blue 4M, Green Hairstreak 1, Small Heath 2, Speckled Wood 1. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


Glanville Fritillaries - Compton Bay IOW. Today I made the not inconsiderable journey by train, ferry, and foot across the south-western Isle of Wight, heading for the chalk cliffs and grassy headlands surrounding Compton Bay, on my annual pilgrimage in search of the Glanville Fritillary. I would normally have timed this visit one or two weeks earlier, but the arrival of a decent weather window (at last!) seemed to bode well, and and I wasn't disappointed. Good numbers were seen, and for the first time ever, I saw several Glanvilles up on top of the huge chalk ridge above the Military Road, which is part of the Freshwater Golf Club course. Conditions were breezy but bright and sunny, affording several good photographic opportunities. [Posted by Michael Jameson]

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Glanville Fritillary at Freshwater Golf Course
Photo © Michael Jameson
Glanville Fritillary - Compton Bay
Photo © Michael Jameson
Glanville Fritillary - Compton Bay
Photo © Michael Jameson

Martin Down. I saw about a dozen Marsh Fritillary on a 2 hour stroll at Martin Down today. Almost all were getting shiny and worn due to the recent windy weather. Most were males, but I did find an ovipositing female with a batch of about 100 eggs. Other species included 20+ Small Heaths, 3 Brown Argus, 2 fresh male Adonis Blues, 8 Common Blues, 1 Small Blue, 1 Small Copper, 6 Dingy Skippers and 2 Grizzled Skippers. Females of Brimstone were also seen ovipositing on buckthorn leaves, and I found several larvae of various instars, and a single pupa. Among the moths, there were plenty of Cinnabars, Silver Y and lots of 5-spot Burnets (several with confluent spots) including many mating pairs. Also a batch of 2nd instar Emperor moth larvae. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


31 May 2024

Chalton Down, Old Idsworth. Today at Chalton Down the temperature reached 16 degrees. Here once more very little was on the wing: Common Blue 3M 1F, Small Heath 3, Dingy Skipper 1. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


29 May 2024

In a Burridge garden. A dull day but a first sighting this year in our garden of a Meadow Brown. This is much earlier than previous years. [Posted by Brian Heal]


First Meadow Brown of the summer in Basingstoke. My first Meadow Brown of the year today, a male, in Basingstoke. [Posted by Lee Hurrell]

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Meadow Brown, male, 29th May 2024. Basingstoke.
Photo © Lee Hurrell

Noar Hill. A mostly cloudy afternoon at Noar Hill, with a modest breeze and the temperature hovering between 15-18ºC. Species seen on a 2 hour walk included 6 Small Heaths, 2 Brimstones, 3 Green-veined Whites, 1 female Holly Blue, 4 Common Blues including a mating pair, 1 Small Blue, 7 Dingy Skippers, and 2 or possibly 3 deranged male Emperor moths hurtling around the bushes in search of a female. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


25 May 2024

Marsh Fritillaries at Martin Down. My second visit within a fortnight to Martin Down today finally yielded the desired result, with a good showing of Marsh Fritillaries to be seen in sunny and warm conditions. The population at this location is now well-established, but remains very localised within this large reserve, and these butterflies are easily overlooked. But good numbers were finally located in a sheltered field which originally formed part of a rifle range, suggesting that the Marsh Fritillary is having a better than average year here. Also seen today were Dingy Skipper (5), Green Hairstreak (18+), Common Blue (10), Small Blue (12), and Small heath (30+). A rewarding excursion, and made all the more enjoyable, as is so often the case, by friendly and instructive conversations with fellow enthusiasts along the way! [Posted by Michael Jameson]

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Marsh Fritillary at Martin Down
Photo © Michael Jameson
Marsh Fritillary at Martin Down
Photo © Michael Jameson
Dingy Skipper at Martin Down
Photo © Michael Jameson

Butser Hill. The hottest day of the year, I suspect, with the temperature rising in the afternoon to 25°c. The number of species of butterflies and moths was quite impressive, and for once the Duke of Burgundy didn’t disappoint! On the western side of Butser there was one male and one female seen, the female skulking in amongst the foliage, usual behaviour for the female of the species. On the northern slope there were up to a dozen or more seen and on the valley floor a rare abb:Lecodes, in good condition, was seen holding territory. This wasn’t a pale tatty male: it was a fresh male with pale spots on top of the wings. Up to 42 individuals were seen today which is easily the highest this season for this species.

Other species of note were Green Hairstreak, Brown Argus, Small Copper, Common Blue, Small Blue, Dingy Skipper, Grizzled Skipper and Large Skipper.

Moths seen were Ruby Tiger Moths, 5 spot Burnet Moths, Burnet Companions, Silver’y’s, Cinnabar Moths, and Common Carpets. I thought I may see an Emperor Moth, but I think they may well be on the way out. There were a lot of Skylarks, Yellowhammers, Green Woodpeckers, Red Kites, Buzzards, but no Cuckoo. [Posted by Ashley Whitlock]

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Duke of Burgundy abb:Lecodes
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Ruby Tiger Moth
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Green Hairstreak feeding on Cotoneaster
Photo © Ashley Whitlock

Standing Hat - New Forest. Managed to catch up with the Pearl Bordered Fritillaries at last - weather ruined my earlier attempts but today was perfect. Well into double figures and in virtually all of the rides. Also very fortunate to find a Raft Spider after much searching at this site - in fact there were two very close together in Frohawk Ride. Perfect morning to be out - but at some cost with the traffic on a BH weekend! [Posted by Mark Wagstaff]

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Pearl Bordered Fritillary - Standing Hat
Photo © Mark Wagstaff
Raft Spider - Frohawk Ride
Photo © Mark Wagstaff

24 May 2024

Chalton Down. A walk around Chalton Down after visiting Oxenbourne Down was a disappointment with only a single male Common Blue and a pair of Small Heaths flying. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


Oxenbourne Down. Today I visited Oxenbourne Down where the temperature reached 16.5 degrees. Here I was lucky to find a Green Hairstreak which was happy to settle for a photo. Totals: Brimstone 1M, Common Blue 2M, Green Hairstreak 1, Small Heath 10. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


23 May 2024

Havant Thicket. Today I walked the main track around Havant Thicket and although the temperature was 16 degrees, there was very little flying only Brimstone 1M 1F and a single Speckled Wood. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


Chalton Down, Old Idsworth. Today I visited Chalton Down at Old Idsworth where the temperature reached 16 degrees. Here the Small Heaths and Common Blues are just emerging. Totals: Small White 2, Common Blue 2M, Small Heath 8, Dingy Skipper 1. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


20 May 2024

Portsdown Hill (East) and Fort Widley. Today after visiting Paulsgrove Chalk Pits, I walked around Fort Widley then along the trackway below the fort on the opposite side of the road. The footpath around Fort Widley was a disappointment with nothing to be seen on the wing, until I saw an exotic looking butterfly on a buttercup. It was the size of a Nymphalid, had a black underside with black, yellow and some green colouration around the upper wings. Before I had chance to get a photograph, it flew off but did circle close for a short time without settling. It was seen by a gate leading to the path heading to the car park at the western end of the fort. Having described this sighting to my son, he suggested it may have been a day flying moth or some kind or an exotic butterfly purposely released. Will be interesting if anyone else records it.

Meanwhile of the more native species I did record my first male Common Blue of the season. My totals were: Brimstone 3m, Small White 3, Orange-tip 1M, Common Blue 1M and Speckled Wood 1. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


Paulsgrove Chalk Pits. Today I visited Paulsgrove Chalk Pits where the temperature reached 20 degrees. Walking most of the site very little was on the wing although I was pleased to see my first Small Blues of the season, the species I had come to target. Totals: Small White 4 and Small Blue 3. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


Fort Purbrook. Another warm sunny afternoon encouraged me to spend an hour at the sheltered glade at Fort Purbrook, where I saw a minimum of 7 Common Blues (including 2 females), 1 Holly Blue and a couple of Brimstones. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


Martin Down Field Trip. There was a certain amount of doom and gloom as we all stood in the car park with no sun and warm coats and hats at the short trail. Not a good way to start a field trip but we did and hoped for a miracle! I was confidently told that the sun would appear at around about 11:00, and sure enough it did, and then the site exploded with species and one of the targets was met. Plenty of Marsh Fritillary were seen battling for territories and good amounts of other species like Dingy Skipper, Grizzled Skipper, Common Blue, Holly Blue, Small Heath, Green Hairstreak, Small Copper, Common Blue, Brimstone, and Red Admiral.

The moths were not to be outdone, plenty of Silver Y moth, 5 Spot Burnet Moth, Cinnabar moth, Yellow Shell, Lackey Moth caterpillars, Burnet Companion, Common Heath and to top it off at least three Emperor Moths which attacked my camera, bag which still had my Emperor Moth Lure attached!

Lots of lovely wildflowers with orchids out in bloom and good birds as well with the Cuckoo singing in the distance, lots of Skylarks, with other hedgerow birds like Yellowhammers, Stonechats, Whitethroats, and Corn Buntings to name a few. It was a great field trip and sorry to the those that went to Sillens Lane but no doubt your list was just as good. [Posted by Ashley Whitlock]

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Dingy Skipper
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Cinnabar Moth jutch hatched out
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Marsh Fritillary
Photo © Ashley Whitlock

19 May 2024

Stockbridge Down. A sunny and warm couple of hours at Stockbridge Down this afternoon, with a maximum of 21°C. Butterflies were generally in low numbers - about 30 Small Heath, 1 Peacock, 1 Red Admiral, 1 Painted Lady, 1 Duke of Burgundy, 7 Green Hairstreak, 3 Brown Argus, 2 Common Blue, 1 Holly Blue, 30 Brimstone, 1 Orange-tip, 20 Grizzled Skipper and 25 Dingy Skipper. [Posted by Adrian Hoskins]


Pearl-bordered Fritillary aberration. A visit to Pignal Inclosure in lovely warm sunshine produced a reasonable number of Pearl-bordered Fritillaries, including an aberration with a white hind-wing, and a patch of white on the right forewing, and a tiny patch of white on the left hind-wing margin. This is the first time I've seen an aberration like this for Pearl-bordered Fritillary. As always, the favourite PBF nectar source was Bugle, but Common Cat's-ear and Wood Spurge were also used.

The total butterfly tally for the visit was Pearl-bordered Fritillary (15), Peacock (1), Speckled Wood (1), Brimstone (1) and Painted Lady (1). The tally for moths was Brown Silver-line (2), Burnet Companion (1) and Mother Shipton (1). [Posted by Andy Barker]

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Pearl-bordered Fritillary (aberration)
Photo © Andy Barker
Pearl-bordered Fritillary (nectaring)
Photo © Andy Barker
Pearl-bordered Fritillary (underside)
Photo © Andy Barker

Glanvilles at Freshwater.. A lovely warm,sunny,and breezy day along the cliff top close to Freshwater Bay and on the landslip small numbers of Glanville Fritillary. [Posted by Peter Hunt]

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Photo © Peter HuntPhoto © Peter Hunt

18 May 2024

North Baddesley sightings. Seen on the 18th May first sightings of the season of Large Skipper and Marsh Fritillary. [Posted by Kevin Ross]

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Photo © Kevin RossPhoto © Kevin Ross

Green hairstreaks near Great Deane Wood. I encountered one presumed egg-laying female Green hairstreak butterfly on 15/05/2024 on a triangle of 'set-aside' farmland, situated between White lane track/footpath (between Ashwarren hamlet and Malshanger) and Great Deane wood.

I then encountered 3 Green hairstreaks on 17/05/2024, these are in the pics below.

The site is ideal for them; sunny, sheltered, smothered in wild strawberry runners, common rockrose, wood spurge, veronica sp. etc with hawthorn and dogwood hedges.

It is also contains numerous anthills, although I have only noticed black ants so far, not the red Myrmica sabuleti, which has a suspected association with the pupae of this butterfly species.

Also; is photo 1 a 'punctata' form of the Green hairstreak as it has white dashes on both fore and hind underwings? [Posted by Andrea Lee]

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Green hairstreak
Photo © Andrea Lee
Green hairstreak
Photo © Andrea Lee
Green hairstreak
Photo © Andrea Lee

17 May 2024

Chalton Down. Today I visited Chalton Down, Old Idsworth where the temperature was 18 degrees. Here I saw a total of seven different species including my first Small Heaths of the season. The downland appears to have been grazed as the turf was short as it had been until around 5 years ago, hopefully benefitting the Chalk Hill Blues and Small Blues found here. Totals: Brimstone 1M 1F, Small White 2, Orange-tip 3M, Small Heath 3, Peacock 1, Red Admiral 1 and Grizzled Skipper 1. [Posted by Roy Symonds]


15 May 2024

Field Trip to New Forest Pignal and Pig Bush Inclosure. New Forest Wednesday 15th May 2024 sunny part cloudy breezy

An excellent field trip to the New Forest where the sightings of fresh Pearl-bordered Fritillaries were a joy to see and watch as they battled for territories and made hay whilst the sun shone in their forest world. There were over thirty seen mainly males and were feeding on very few wildflowers in the rides. In fact, there were very few butterflies seen; these were just a few Speckled Woods, one Orange-tip a few Brimstones, and Silver ’y’ moths and Common Carpet and lots of Brown Silver Line moths in the rides. Other flora and fauna seen were Newts in the large puddles created in the rides by the work being done by the Forestry re-surfacing some of the rides, also several Dragonflies, lots of Frog Tadpoles, which were probably being eaten by the large and menacing looking Raft Spider. In the afternoon on the heathland at Pig Bush the emperor Moth was seen flying frantically around my lure on my camera bag, along with male and female Common Heath Moths and Small Purple Barred Moth. Birds heard and seen were Stonechats, Cuckoo, Skylarks, and Redstarts. [Posted by Ashley Whitlock]

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Male Pearl Bordered Fritillary
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Finding a nectar source was very hard!
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Male Common Heath Moth
Photo © Ashley Whitlock

Pearls aplenty at Parkhill. Fine, warm weather and light winds today attended my second visit to the woods surrounding Brockenhurst in the hope of finding more Pearl-Bordered Fritillaries, and this time, I was not disappointed! During several hours spent exploring the Parkhill Inclosure, south of the main railway line, I saw approaching forty individuals, all of which were in very fresh condition. On this occasion, close-up photography was possible, yielding some pleasing results, a selection of which can be seen below. We were last here on Saturday 11th May, and saw very few PBFs, and those we did see were flighty and did not settle. Not so today, when the majority were seemingly unaware of the camera, allowing a close approach to be made, whilst one individual obligingly settled on my shirt, and seemed reluctant to leave, only taking wing some 10 minutes later! It was good to see reassuringly good numbers of this increasingly declining species today. [Posted by Michael Jameson]

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Pearl-Bordered Fritillary at Parkhill
Photo © Michael Jameson
Pearl-Bordered Fritillary at Parkhill
Photo © Michael Jameson
Pearl-Bordered Fritillaries at Parkhill
Photo © Michael Jameson

Green Hairstreaks at Parkhill Inclosure. A successful further visit to Brockenhurst today in search of the Pearl-bordered Fritillary also found the Green Hairstreak in abundance in the rides. Interestingly, although the males were all of normal appearance, every female observed was of the Caecus form, in which the distinctive white streaks usually visible on the underwings are entirely absent. These photos below show both forms. [Posted by Michael Jameson]

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Brown Hairstreak (M) Parkhill Inclosure
Photo © Michael Jameson
Brown Hairstreak (F) form Caecus
Photo © Michael Jameson
Brown Hairstreak (F) form Caecus
Photo © Michael Jameson

Martin Down. A morning of sunshine and cloud and quite a stiff wind meant it was pretty hard going but the following were eventually seen between 10.15 and 13.00. Painted Lady 1, Red Admiral 1, Speckled Wood 1, Green Hairstreak 4, Small Blue 6, Grizzled Skipper 8, Dingy Skipper 6, Brimstone 10, Small Copper 1, Small Heath 6, Silver Y moths 15. The Burnt Tip Orchids were showing particularly well. [Posted by Mark Pike]

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Green Hairstreak
Photo © Mark Pike
Small Blue
Photo © Mark Pike
Small Heath Pair
Photo © Mark Pike

Painted Lady at Freshwater Bay.. A Painted Lady seen this morning at 10am in the Afton Down National Trust carpark before flying on.. [Posted by Peter Hunt]


Painted Lady at Freshwater Bay.. A Painted Lady seen this morning at 10am in the Afton Down National Trust carpark before flying on.. [Posted by Peter Hunt]


14 May 2024

Painted Lady in my Freshwater garden.. A Painted Lady appeared in my Freshwater garden this afternoon and nectared on a Cosmos flower and Camassia flowers before flying on over the hedge. [Posted by Peter Hunt]


12 May 2024

Small Blue out near Wonston!. Private site near Wonston this afternoon - I was having a pretty dull visit (~10 Brimstones, 1 Speckled Wood, 2 Pieris spp., 1 Red Admiral), until, right at the end, I picked up a flash of blue, expecting a Holly Blue - but no, it wasnt, it was a pristine Small Blue: I think my earliest ever in Hampshire (there is a colony on Portland that routinely appears ~25 April) [Posted by David Murdoch]


Field Trip West Wood and Pitt Down. West Wood Field Trip meeting today was rather warm walking around both West Wood and Pitt Down however we saw the Woodland Duke of Burgundy (20) and many other species Grizzled Skipper, Small Heath, Holly Blue, Brimstones, Orange-tips, Speckled Wood, Red Admiral, Comma, Green Hairstreaks, Green Veined Whites, and Small White. Moths were very sparse with Common Carpets, lots of Silver Y moths and a Barred Umber Moth [Posted by Ashley Whitlock]

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Male Duke of Burgundy in West Wood
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Female Duke of Burgundy testing a Primrose leaf
Photo © Ashley Whitlock
Four Duke eggs laid on Ground Ivy
Photo © Ashley Whitlock

11 May 2024

First Pearl-Bordered Fritillaries of 2024 at Parkhill. Another warm and sunny day seemed ideal for possible sightings of the Pearl-bordered Fritillary at a favoured New Forest site, the Parkhill Inclosure, near Brockenhurst. Five individuals were seen during one hour walking up and down the ride, but these were all exceptionally agile, and their flighty behaviour made photography virtually impossible, since none would oblige by settling for more than an instant before flying off once again. So these three photos are the best I could achieve under the circumstances, serving for little more than documentary evidence that PBF emergence has begun in the New Forest. Good multiple sightings here in the past two years extend the hope that PBF numbers will build nicely throughout the remainder of May, and this late start can perhaps be attributed to the cold and unsettled weather we experienced during April, not that the forecast for the coming week or so seems much better! [Posted by Michael Jameson]

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Pearl-Bordered Fritillary (1)
Photo © Michael Jameson
Pearl-Bordered Fritillary (2)
Photo © Michael Jameson
Pearl-Bordered Fritillary (3)
Photo © Michael Jameson

Small Blues at Freshwater.. At least four Small Blues at Freshwater today at the rear of the National Trust Afton Down Carpark.Also a bright but elusive male Common Blue. [Posted by Peter Hunt]

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Photo © Peter HuntPhoto © Peter Hunt

Small Blues at Freshwater.. At least four Small Blues at Freshwater today at the rear of the National Trust Afton Down Carpark.Also a bright but elusive male Common Blue. [Posted by Peter Hunt]

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Photo © Peter HuntPhoto © Peter Hunt

10 May 2024

Portsdown Hill (East). After visiting Chalton Down I walked the paths at the East end of Portsdown Hill below Fort Widley. A few Brimstones and fresh male and female Orange-tips were seen. Totals: Brimstone 2M, Small White 1 and Orange-tip 2M 2F. [Posted by Roy Symonds]

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